Service manual for 2006 pontiac solstice

Service manual for 2006 pontiac solstice

Text Search To search for combination of words or phrases, separate items with commas. Please enter one or more search terms to filter these listings. Jump service manual for 2006 pontiac solstice navigation Jump to search This article is about the automobile brand.

Pontiac is a now-defunct car brand that was owned, made, and sold by General Motors. Sold in the United States, Canada, and Mexico by GM, Pontiac was advertised as the performance division of General Motors from the 1960s onward. Amid late 2000s financial problems and restructuring efforts, GM announced in 2008 it would follow the same path with Pontiac as it had with Oldsmobile in 2004 and discontinued manufacturing and marketing vehicles under that brand by the end of 2010. The last Pontiac badged cars were built in December 2009, with one final vehicle in January, 2010. The Pontiac brand was introduced by General Motors in 1926 as the companion marque to GM’s Oakland division, and shared the GM A platform.

Pontiacs were also manufactured from knock-down kits at GM’s short-lived Japanese factory at Osaka Assembly in Osaka, Japan from 1927-1941. American car in the industry at the time. For an extended period of time—prewar through the early 1950s—the Pontiac was a quiet, solid car, but not especially powerful. It came with a flathead straight eight.

Straight 8s were slightly less expensive to produce than the increasingly popular V8s, but they were also heavier and longer. From 1946 to 1948, all Pontiac models were essentially 1942 models with minor changes. The Hydra-matic automatic transmission was introduced in 1948 and helped Pontiac sales grow even though their cars, Torpedoes and Streamliners, were quickly becoming out of date. The first all-new Pontiac models appeared in 1949. They incorporated styling cues such as lower body lines and rear fenders that were integrated in the rear-end styling of the car. Along with new styling came a new model.

Continuing the Native American theme of Pontiac, the Chieftain line was introduced to replace the Torpedo. These were built on the GM B-Body platform and featured different styling than the more conservative Streamliner. In 1952, Pontiac discontinued the Streamliner and replaced it with additional models in the Chieftain line built on the GM A-body platform. This single model line continued until 1954 when the Star Chief was added. The 1953 models were the first to have one-piece windshields instead of the normal two-piece units. 1956 Canadian Pontiac Pathfinder Sedan delivery. 1,383 built, not available in the U.


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